News

Major Irish study finds ‘no safety concern’ from exposure to fluoride

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Dentists say €40m Sugar Tax take could radically improve dental health

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16th May 2016 Dentists warn that sugar tax is no silver bullet for nations dental crisis/

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21 August, 2015 Dentists welcome findings of new review on fluoridation

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July 9th, 2015 American Dental Association discusses Top 9 foods that damage your teeth

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November 13th, 2014 Dental professor says combination of fluoridated water and fluoride toothpaste works best in tackling dental decay

A dental health professor has said that using fluoridated water in tandem with toothpaste with fluoride is the most effective way of preventing caries or dental decay.

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September 24th, 2014 Leaders of 1m+ Dentists Across 134 Countries Endorse Fluoridation in Promoting Oral Health

Dental leaders, representing over one million dentists in 134 countries have reaffirmed their strong support for fluoridation as essential in promoting oral health.

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July 2nd, 2014 Two million people can get a free dental check-up – but most of us don’t even know it exists

According to TheJournal.ie two million people can get a free dental check-up – but most of us don’t even know it exists

Only 15 per cent of people actually made use of their free check-up last year.

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March 1st, 2014 What problems could my dental health cause?

There are new findings which support something that dental professionals have suspected for a long time – infections in the mouth can cause problems in other parts of the body.

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January 14th, 2014 Stress can impact oral health

Long-term stress can have significant impact on one’s oral health, an aspect that has come to light due to the increasing incidence of gum diseases, tooth decay and also foul breath.

Teeth are the strongest parts of the body, but changing lifestyles have shown that they too are becoming more and more vulnerable.

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January 9th, 2014 People in denial about their dental health

Four out of five Irish people think their teeth and gums are healthy and look good – however, the reality is somewhat different as people are now visiting the dentist far less often than they used to.

A new survey has found 23% of people are visiting the dentist less often since 2010 while nearly 60% of those surveyed said they would only consider visiting the dentist in an emergency.

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August 1st, 2013 Risks of Dental Piercings

Dentists are warning young people that oral piercings pose a significant risk to their health and in extreme cases can result in life threatening illness and infections.

The Irish Dental Association says some issues which may arise from piercings include; infections, the transfer of diseases such as Hep B, C and D, EndocardItis, gum disease, nerve damage, tooth damage and allergic reaction to metals.

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July 31st, 2013 Heatburn may be a predictor of Oral Cancer

New research from the U.S. has suggested that gastric reflux, which causes frequent heartburn, is associated with throat cancer and cancer of the vocal cords. In addition, the study of almost 1,900 individuals found that antacid substances could reduce the risk of developing these cancers.

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July 30th, 2013 Dental Hygiene May be Linked to Incidence of Dementia (MetroHerald)

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April 24th, 2013 Hepatitis C found among Irish people who travelled overseas for dental treatment
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April 8th, 2013 One in five Irish people suffering from tooth sensitivity

One in five Irish people suffering from tooth sensitivity

 

The Irish Dental Association has urged patients who suffer from tooth sensitivity not to over-brush their teeth.

It’s estimated one in five Irish people suffer from sensitive teeth and the number is thought to be rising.

Symptoms include discomfort after eating cold food, drinking cold liquids or even breathing cold air.

Sensitivity pain occurs when the enamel which protects teeth is worn away and the inner substance of the tooth – dentine – becomes exposed.

While over-brushing or brushing teeth with too much force is viewed as the main cause, the condition can also be caused by eating acidic food, gum disease/recession and tooth whitening.

Anyone can suffer from the condition but it mainly affects those between the ages of 20 and 40.

Dublin based dentist Dr Ray McCarthy said the most common cause of tooth sensitivity is gum recession, often due to vigorous or heavy handed brushing.

“Our gums are like blankets which protect the roots of the teeth. If this protective layer is worn away the roots which are linked directly to the nerve become exposed and painful. However if patients suffering from the condition follow an effective but safe oral hygiene routine, the sensitivity can be cleared in a matter of weeks” he said.

Dr McCarthy, who’s also a clinical tutor at the Dublin Dental Hospital, advised patients suffering from tooth sensitivity to:

  • Set aside 2 to 3 minutes twice a day to properly brush and floss all tooth surfaces
  • Reduce pressure while brushing and use a soft or medium bristled tooth brush
  • Not brush their teeth for one hour after consuming acidic drinks or foodstuffs
  • Use less abrasive or desensitising toothpastes, or mouth-rinses on the advice of your dentist
  • Consult your dentist if symptoms persist

For Further Information

Contact Kieran Garry
Gordon MRM
01/6650455 or 087/2368366

kieran@gordonmrm.ie

April 4th, 2013 Dentists highlight potential breaches of new Tooth Whitening Regulations

DENTISTS HIGHLIGHT POTENTIAL BREACHES OF NEW TOOTH WHITENING REGULATIONS

‘SERIOUS CONCERNS’ TO BE RAISED AT UPCOMING NATIONAL COUNCIL MEETING

The Irish Dental Association has said it is deeply concerned that a number of businesses which offer tooth whitening services here in Ireland could be operating illegally.

The warning comes after four tooth whitening businesses were unable to provide details on the gels they use for tooth whitening while only one of the four said their clients were examined by a dentist.

A new European Council Directive bans the use and sale of tooth whitening products which contain over 6% hydrogen peroxide – the chemical used in tooth whitening. Products containing more than 0.1% and up to 6% can only be administered in the first instance by a dentist, and thereafter on the prescription of a dentist. Tooth whitening is also restricted to those over 18 years of age.  Any course of tooth whitening has to be preceded by a full clinical examination to ensure the suitability of the case, in particular the absence of any oral pathology.

The warning comes after the issue of non compliance was highlighted in an article in the current edition of the Journal of the Irish Dental Association.

The IDA’s Dr Tom Feeney, said the Association would discuss the issue at its next National Council Meeting on the 8th of March.

“We are very concerned at the latest revelations. The purpose of the new Cosmetics’ Directive was to properly regulate the whole tooth whitening sector and to put an end to unregulated operators, in the interests of patient safety.  Many of the tooth whitening shops claim rapid success in the bleaching process but are extremely reluctant to disclose the active ingredient in the gels they apply. This would raise suspicions that illegal concentrations of hydrogen peroxide are being used as rapid one visit tooth bleaching is not possible with legal concentrations”, Dr Feeney said.

He said the IDA also had serious concerns about the training and qualifications of the personnel carrying out the procedure. “Only one of the four businesses contacted said a dentist examined clients. We believe this is wrong and that a dentist must always examine the patient to determine whether tooth whitening is a suitable treatment option and to ensure the absence of risk factors in the mouth. In addition tooth whitening is not appropriate for pregnant women or heavy drinkers or smokers.

When these new regulations were introduced last November we welcomed them as they ensure that qualified dentists are carrying out what is a dental procedure, that safe products are being used and that the treatment is restricted to those over 18. However the regulations must be enforced” Dr Feeney said.

The IDA had previously warned of the dangers of some products available via the internet which contain very high levels of hydrogen peroxide and which could be lethal in the wrong hands.

Anyone who directly imports a tooth-whitening product from outside the EU may be considered to be the responsible person and therefore legally accountable for ensuring that the product is in compliance with the legislation.

Dr Feeney urged anyone with concerns about the possibility of illegal practice to contact the Irish Medicines Board at cosmetics@imb.ie

Advice to the public:

1.      Only go to regulated professionals, i.e. dentists

2.      If in doubt ask for the Dental Council Registration Number

3.      Ask for the product used and its concentration

4.      If a light is being used ask why – it has no effect

5.      Any concerns: contact the Irish Medicines Board

 

For Further Information

Contact Kieran Garry

Gordon MRM

01/6650455 or 087/2368366

Kieran@gordonmrm.ie

 

Note to Editor

Certain information should be present on the label of tooth whitening products i.e., name and address of the responsible person, weight/volume, best before date, precautions for use, batch number, etc. – please check the Dental Council/IMB notice for the exact requirements.The rounded conversion value of 6% hydrogen peroxide is 17% carbamide peroxide.

Oral Health and General Health

Click here to see some great tips on Oral & General Health from the Dental Health Foundation :

http://www.dentalhealth.ie/dentalhealth/causes/general.html

Dentists issue new guidelines for the public on mouthguards

DENTISTS ISSUE NEW GUIDELINES ON MOUTHGUARDS

IDA PRESIDENT SAYS NEW GAA RULE MUST BE ENFORCED

The Irish Dental Association has issued new guidelines on the use of mouthguards and urged gaelic football referees and coaches to strictly enforce new rules on their mandatory use by juvenile players

From the 1st of January it is compulsory for juvenile gaelic footballers to wear mouthguards in football games and training.

In advance of a practise management seminar in Croke Park which will be attended by 180 dentists from all round the country, the IDA approved a public information document which sets out the key points on mouthguards.

Speaking at the launch of the seminar, the President of the Association, Dr Andrew Bolas said he was concerned at reports that several college footballers were photographed playing without mouthguards in Munster and Leinster games earlier this week.

“Previously we had urged the GAA to bring in this rule and we warmly welcomed it when it was introduced. However strict enforcement from the start is key as we have seen from the success of the ‘no mouthguard no play’ approach adopted by other codes from under 6 right up to minor/u18 level” Dr Bolas said.

According to the new document the majority of traumatic dental injuries occur to the upper front teeth in adults and children. “The use of a properly fitting mouth guard can reduce the incidence of injuries to the teeth and surrounding tissues. A mouth guard should fit properly, adequately cover the teeth and stay in position during impact.”

The new guide urges all those involved in organised sporting activities from players to coaches to managers to be aware of how to deal with unexpected dental trauma as immediate attention is required to maximise the successful outcome of any dental injury.

Dr Bolas said he frequently get called into Sligo General Hospital to treat the results of sports related injuries.

“Some injuries to teeth from a clash of heads or a stray elbow can be quite horrific, with teeth broken, displaced or completely knocked out. It is well worthwhile talking to your dentist about the best options. While customised mouthguards are more expensive initially, they do provide the best comfort and protection and could well prove much cheaper in the long run” Dr Bolas concluded.

The Association says members will be encouraged to place the document in a prominent position in their surgeries.

 

IDA POSITION STATEMENT ON THE PREVENTION OF SPORTS-RELATED INJURIES

The Irish Dental Association promotes the use of mouthguards (gumshields) in sports to prevent injury to the mouth and teeth, particularly in contact sports. The IDA supports the mandatory use of properly fitting mouthguards in organised activities that carries a risk of orofacial injury. The IDA supports the education of the general public and sports personnel in the prevention of orofacial injuries in various sporting and recreational activities.

The majority of traumatic dental injuries occur to the upper front teeth in adults and children. The use of a properly fitting mouth guard can reduce the incidence of injuries to the teeth and surrounding tissues. A mouth guard should fit properly, adequately cover the teeth and stay in position during impact. Particularly for children who are actively growing, the fit of the mouthguard will need to be revised frequently to maintain good protection.  Mouthguards should be worn during training as well as competitive games.

There are 3 types of mouthguards:

  1. Individualised mouthguards are custom fabricated following an accurate dental impression by your dentist.  They are made to fit exactly to the shape, size and bite of each player. These mouthguards provide the best comfort, protection and design.  The colour of the mouthguard can be customised. A full dental examination is advisable before making a custom fitted mouthguard. They are less bulky and more comfortable to wear than other types of mouthguards.
  2. Pre-formed or ‘boil and bite’ mouthguards. These are available in a limited range of sizes and can be moulded to the mouth when softened in hot water.   These tend to be bulky, less retentive and offer limited protection to the teeth compared to a custom-fit mouthguard.
  3. Stock mouthguards. These are also preformed mouthguards in a range of sizes.  They fit over the dental arches and do not mould to the teeth.  Their retention depends on biting the mouthguard to keep it in place which means that the player cannot speak or breathe without being aware of the mouthguard position. These provide the least amount of protection.

Poorly fitting mouthguards are less likely to be worn, can irritate tissues and reduce protection. Your mouth guard should be regularly examined for fit and retention. Your dentist can advise you of the best type of mouth guard that provides adequate protection in your situation eg. growing child, wearing braces, type of sport,  etc.

Participants in organised sporting activities (players, team doctors, physiotherapists, parents and coaches) should also be aware of  how to deal with unexpected dental trauma.  Since sporting events and training often occur outside normal working hours, it is important that all teams have a dentist on call to help with injured players. Immediate attention is required to maximise the successful outcome of any dental injury.

For more information on mouthguards and traumatic injuries to the mouth, contact your local dentist and refer towww.dentaltraumaguide.com.

Dentists welcome new rules for tooth whitening & mouthguards and issue top tip guide for better dental health in 2013

The Irish Dental Association, has welcomed the introduction of new rules on tooth whitening and mouthguards which it says will offer greater dental protection to the public in 2013.

Late last year a new European Council Directive came into force which strictly regulates the use and sale of hydrogen peroxide – the chemical used in tooth whitening. Under the Directive tooth whitening can only be carried out by a dentist.

From the 1st of January 2013 it is compulsory for juvenile gaelic footballers to wear mouthguards in football games and training.

The President of the Association, Dr Andrew Bolas said he hoped that GAA coaches all round the country enforced the new rules from the start.

“I frequently get called into Sligo General Hospital to treat the results of sports related injuries. Some injuries to teeth from a clash of heads or a stray elbow can be quite horrific, with teeth broken, displaced or completely knocked out” he said.

Dr Bolas said that whilst off the shelf mouthguards provide some protection and are certainly better than no mouthguard, care should be taken when fitting to ensure a good tight fit around the front teeth.

“It is well worthwhile talking to your dentist about the best options. While customised mouthguards are more expensive initially they could well prove much cheaper than the treatment needed to repair or replace traumatised teeth” Dr Bolas said.

All the top tips and further information relating to dental health are available at www.dentist.ie.

TOP TIP GUIDE FOR 2013

  1. Ensure that children who play contact sports have a well fitted mouthguard which offers maximum protection and fits tightly around the front teeth;
  2. For consistent cleaning, brush your teeth and gums at the same time every day, e.g. after breakfast and before going to bed. Supervise children under seven. Only use the recommended amount of toothpaste and ensure all teeth and gums are cleaned thoroughly;
  3. Make a special effort to quit smoking. Smoking is a major cause of preventable death and oral problems include bad breath, stained teeth, tooth loss and oral cancer. Your dentist can advise;
  4. Change your toothbrush every three months and make sure to floss at least once a day;
  5. Take time to read the sugar content of your food and drink and reduce intake of high sugar content foods. Keep snacks between meals to low-sugar or sugar-free foods;
  6. Remember there is a relationship between oral health and general health and ask your dentist if a visit to your medical practitioner is appropriate;
  7. Make a resolution to visit your dentist regularly so that small problems can be resolved before they become bigger, more complicated and expensive;
  8. If you decide to whiten your teeth, contact your dentist as s/he can ensure safe and professional teeth whitening under the care of a qualified dental practitioner;
  9. Arrange preventative fissure sealants for children reaching the age of six or seven as directed by your dentist. Follow up at six or twelve months intervals;
  10. If you notice ulcers or lumps in your mouth or neck persisting for more than a week, arrange to have an oral cancer screening appointment with your dentist.

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